You Can’t Move History – a film by Winstan Whitter

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Winstan Whitter’s association with Southbank goes back so far that it’s no surprise that he decided to make another documentary on skateboarding’s most famous UK spot. With the recent fight to keep the space in the hands of British skaters, Whitter’s new short web documentary ‘You Can’t Move History‘ looks into the process that saved Southbank from relocation and the communication behind LLSB’s efforts to get the job done.

Get the teas on and look back on an important happening in British skateboarding.

LLSB Propose Southbank Restoration

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Today Long Live Southbank have released a 50 page document proposing that the full area of the Southbank undercroft be restored to it’s original design and vision of the architects.
This spot is of absolute paramount importance to the UK skate scene. Southbank has been a home to skaters from every imaginable background since 1973, making it not only one of the oldest skated places in the UK but in the world too.

Southbank supports the development of the young and is a centerpiece to our community, bringing all types together and feeding the creative, supplying opportunities that are rarely seen in any other place but can all be found in this hub. Sadly, in 2004/5 two thirds of the space was closed off for temporary storage. It has been closed since and the landowners have failed to fulfill their promise of reopening it.

LLSB has already saved the remaining third with over 150,000 signatures, the largest signed building permissions objection in British History. They now aim to restore Southbank to it’s former glory.

Read more about the proposal here and drop a line to info@llsb.com if you’re interested in helping out.

LLSB secure the future of Southbank

Photo: Maksim Kalanep

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A press release has just reached us from the Southbank Centre on the future of the Undercroft and the relationship between them and the Long Live Southbank campaigners, and it looks like VERY good news if you read both statements below. Southbank is SAVED.

Well done to all involved who backed the campaign and of course, all those who tirelessly worked to stop the relocation of arguably the most historic, natural skate spot in the UK.

JOINT STATEMENT: LONG LIVE SOUTHBANK AND SOUTHBANK CENTRE SECURE FUTURE OF UNDERCROFT FOR SKATEBOARDING AND URBAN ACTIVITIES

Following talks that have taken place over the last three months, Long Live Southbank and Southbank Centre are delighted to have reached an agreement that secures the Queen Elizabeth Hall undercroft as the long-term home of British skateboarding and the other urban activities for which it is famous.

The agreement has been formalised in a binding planning agreement with Lambeth Council. In the agreement, Southbank Centre agrees to keep the undercroft open for use without charge for skateboarding, BMX riding, street writing and other urban activities.

On the basis of the protections secured by the planning agreement, Southbank Centre and Long Live Southbank have withdrawn their respective legal actions in relation to the undercroft. These include Southbank Centre’s challenge to the registration of the undercroft as an asset of community value, Long Live Southbank’s application for village green status for the undercroft, and a judicial review of Lambeth Council’s decision to reject the village green application.

Long Live Southbank is pleased to support Southbank Centre’s Festival Wing project for the improvement of the Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and Hayward Gallery, on the basis that the plans will now no longer include any redevelopment within the skate area of the Queen Elizabeth Hall undercroft.

Cllr Lib Peck, Leader of Lambeth Council said; “I’m pleased that Lambeth Council was able to work with both sides and find an imaginative solution to resolve this. Shared public space in London is precious and Southbank Centre is a great asset to the country’s cultural life. This agreement is a sensible way of protecting both and we can all now look forward.”